Vitamin A

Share this page:
Looking for your tests results? Looking for reference ranges?
Also known as: Retinol
Formal name: Retinol
Related tests: Complete Blood Count (CBC), CMP, Vitamin B12 and Folate, Vitamin D, Iron Tests, Retinol-Binding Protein

At a Glance

Why Get Tested?

To detect vitamin A deficiency or toxicity

When to Get Tested?

When a person has symptoms suggesting a vitamin A deficiency or excess, or is at risk for a deficiency

Sample Required?

A blood sample drawn from a vein in your arm

Test Preparation Needed?

Fasting is required, and no alcohol should be consumed for 24 hours before sample collection.

The Test Sample

What is being tested?

This test measures the level of retinol in the blood; retinol is the primary form of vitamin A in animals. Vitamin A is an essential nutrient required for healthy vision, skin growth and integrity, bone formation, immune function, and embryonic development. It is required to produce photoreceptors in the eyes and to maintain the lining of the surface of the eyes and other mucous membranes. Deficiencies in vitamin A can impair night vision, cause eye damage, and in severe cases lead to blindness. Acute or chronic excesses of vitamin A can be toxic, cause a range of symptoms, and sometimes lead to birth defects.

The body cannot make vitamin A and must rely on dietary sources of vitamin A. Meat sources provide vitamin A (as retinol), while vegetable and fruit sources provide carotene (a substance that can be converted into vitamin A by the liver). Vitamin A is stored in the liver and fat tissues (it is fat-soluble), and healthy adults may have as much as a year's worth stored. The body maintains a relatively stable concentration in the blood through a feedback system that releases vitamin A from storage as needed and increases or decreases the efficiency of dietary vitamin A absorption.

Deficiencies in vitamin A are rare in the United States, but they are a major health problem in many developing nations where high numbers of people have limited diets. One of the first signs of vitamin A deficiency is night blindness. In a 1995-2005 review of the global prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in populations at risk, the World Health Organization estimated that night blindness affected as many as 5 million preschool age children and nearly 10 million pregnant women. In addition to this, they estimated that another 190 million preschool age children and 19 million pregnant women were at risk of vitamin A deficiency, with low retinol levels that reflected an inadequate supply of vitamin A.

In the U.S., deficiencies are primarily seen in those with malnutrition, with malabsorption disorders such as celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, or chronic pancreatitis, in the elderly, and in those with alcoholism and liver disease.

Vitamin A toxicity occurs primarily from overuse of vitamin supplements. However, it can sometimes occur when the diet includes a high proportion of foods that are high in vitamin A, such as liver.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

NOTE: If undergoing medical tests makes you or someone you care for anxious, embarrassed, or even difficult to manage, you might consider reading one or more of the following articles: Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort, and Anxiety, Tips on Blood Testing, Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests, and Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests.

Another article, Follow That Sample, provides a glimpse at the collection and processing of a blood sample and throat culture.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

Fasting is required and no alcohol consumption for 24 hours before sample collection.

The Test

Common Questions

Ask a Laboratory Scientist

This form enables you to ask specific questions about your tests. Your questions will be answered by a laboratory scientist as part of a voluntary service provided by one of our partners, American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science. If your questions are not related to your lab tests, please submit them via our Contact Us form. Thank you.

* indicates a required field



Please indicate whether you are a   
  
  



You must provide a valid email address in order to receive a response.



| Read The Disclaimer


Spam Prevention Equation

| |

Article Sources

« Return to Related Pages

NOTE: This article is based on research that utilizes the sources cited here as well as the collective experience of the Lab Tests Online Editorial Review Board. This article is periodically reviewed by the Editorial Board and may be updated as a result of the review. Any new sources cited will be added to the list and distinguished from the original sources used.

Schwartz, R. et. al. (Updated 2011 January 7). Dermatologic Manifestations of Vitamin A Deficiency. eMedicine [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1104441-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed March 2011.

Ansstas, G. and Thakore, J. (Updated 2010 December 28). Vitamin A Deficiency. eMedicine [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/126004-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed March 2011.

Eledrisi, M. et. al. (Updated 2009 September 2). Vitamin A Toxicity. eMedicine [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/126104-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed March 2011.

Dugdale, D. (Updated 2009 November 15). Vitamin A test. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003570.htm. Accessed March 2011.

Vorvick, L. (Updated 2009 November 1). Beta-carotene test. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003571.htm. Accessed March 2011.

Dugdale, D. (Updated 2010 May 23). Hypervitaminosis A. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000350.htm. Accessed March 2011.

Frank, E. et. al. (Updated 2010 December). Vitamins. ARUP Consult [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.arupconsult.com/Topics/Vitamins.html?client_ID=LTD through http://www.arupconsult.com. Accessed March 2011.

(© 1995-2011). Unit Code 60298: Vitamin A, Serum. Mayo Medical Laboratories [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/print.php?unit_code=60298 through http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com. Accessed March 2011.

Clarke, W. and Dufour, D. R., Editors (© 2006). Contemporary Practice in Clinical Chemistry: AACC Press, Washington, DC. Pp 400-401.

Wu, A. (© 2006). Tietz Clinical Guide to Laboratory Tests, 4th Edition: Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis, MO. Pp 1116-1119.

Barclay, L. (2010 December 8). Vitamin A May Reduce Deaths From Measles and Diarrhea in Children. Medscape Today from Medscape Medical News [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/733832 through http://www.medscape.com. Accessed March 2011.