Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services.

WBC Differential

Print this article
Share this page:
Also known as: Leukocyte Differential Count; Peripheral Differential; WBC Count Differential; Diff
Formal name: White Blood Cell Differential

A WBC differential typically includes the following: absolute neutrophil count or % neutrophils, absolute lymphocyte count or % lymphocytes, absolute monocyte count or % monocytes, absolute eosinophil count or % esosinophils, and absolute basophil count or % basophils.

At a Glance

Why Get Tested?

To help determine the cause of abnormal results on a WBC count; to help diagnose and/or monitor an illness affecting your immune system, such as an infection or inflammatory condition, or cancers that affect your white blood cells, such as leukemia

When to Get Tested?

As part of a complete blood count (CBC), when you have a routine health examination; when results of a CBC fall outside the reference range; when you have any number of signs and symptoms that may be related to a condition affecting white blood cells, such as infection, inflammation, or cancer; when you have a condition or are receiving treatment that is known to affect WBCs

Sample Required?

A blood sample drawn from a vein in your arm or by a fingerstick (children and adults) or heelstick (infants)

Test Preparation Needed?

None