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Digoxin

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Also known as: [Often referred to by brand name (see MedlinePlus Drug Information)]
Formal name: Digoxin

The Test Sample

What is being tested?

Digoxin is a drug used to treat heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms. Heart failure, including congestive heart failure (CHF), causes the heart to become less effective at circulating blood. As a result, blood backs up into the legs, hands, feet, lungs and liver, causing swelling, shortness of breath, and fatigue. This test measures the amount of digoxin in the blood.

Digoxin is prescribed to alleviate some symptoms of heart failure. It strengthens the contractions of the heart and helps it to pump blood more efficiently. Digoxin also helps control the heart rate and abnormal heart rhythms known as arrhythmias. It will not cure heart failure or arrhythmias, which are chronic conditions, but can help to manage the symptoms along with diet, exercise, and other medications.

Digoxin levels must be monitored because the drug has a narrow safety range. If the level in the blood is too low, symptoms may recur. If the level is too high, toxicity may occur. Digoxin dosage may be adjusted based on levels measured.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

NOTE: If undergoing medical tests makes you or someone you care for anxious, embarrassed, or even difficult to manage, you might consider reading one or more of the following articles: Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort, and Anxiety, Tips on Blood Testing, Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests, and Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests.

Another article, Follow That Sample, provides a glimpse at the collection and processing of a blood sample and throat culture.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No special preparation is needed, but timing of sample collection is important and you may be instructed to have your blood drawn a specific number of hours after your last dose of digoxin. When having your blood drawn, tell the person taking your sample when you took your last dose. You may want to write down the exact time at which you took your dose and when the blood was drawn. This information will be useful if your health care provider has any questions about your levels.