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What is aldolase?

Aldolase is an enzyme that helps convert glucose (sugar) into energy. It is found throughout the body but is primarily found in high levels in muscle tissue.

Aldolase levels in the blood rise when a person has muscle damage. The aldolase blood test may be ordered to diagnose and monitor certain conditions related to skeletal muscle. It largely has been replaced by other muscle enzyme tests, especially CK (creatine kinase). However, a minority of people with muscle pain may have an elevated aldolase level even though their creatine kinase is normal. Therefore, the test may sometimes be requested by rheumatologists in addition to creatine kinase.

View Sources

Sources Used in Current Review

Panteghini M, Bais R. Serum enzymes. Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. 6th ed. Nader Rifai, ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2018, chap 29.

(Oct 21, 2017) MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. Aldolase test. Available online at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003566.htm. Accessed March 2019.

Sources Used in Previous Reviews

Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. Burtis CA, Ashwood AR and Bruns DE, ed. 5th ed. St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Saunders; 2012, Pp. 572-573.

Nozaki K, Pestronk A. High aldolase with normal creatine kinase in serum predicts a myopathy with perimysial pathology. J. Neurol Neurosurg Psychiattry 2009; 80:904-909.

Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. Burtis CA, Ashwood ER and Bruns DE, eds. 4th ed. St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Saunders; 2006, Pg 603.

(October 15, 2007) MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Aldolase test. Available online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003566.htm. Accessed April 2009.

(July 12, 2007) Mayo Clinic. Dermatomyositis, Tests and Diagnosis. Available online at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dermatomyositis/DS00335/DSECTION=tests-and-diagnosis. Accessed April 2009.

(July 13, 2007) Mayo Clinic. Polymyositis, Tests and Diagnosis. Available online at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/polymyositis/DS00334/DSECTION=tests-and-diagnosis. Accessed April 2009.

ARUP Consult. Physician’s Guide: Inflammatory Myopathies. Available online at http://www.arupconsult.com/Topics/AutoimmuneDz/ConnectiveTissueDz/InflammatoryMyopathies.html#. Accessed April 2009.

 

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