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BNP and NT-proBNP

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Also known as: Brain Natriuretic Peptide; proBNP; Natriuretic Peptides
Formal name: B-type Natriuretic Peptide; N-terminal pro b-type Natriuretic Peptide
Related tests: Cardiac Biomarkers

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The Test Sample

What is being tested?

B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are substances that are produced in the heart and released when the heart is stretched and working hard to pump blood. Tests for BNP and NT-proBNP measure their levels in the blood in order to detect and evaluate heart failure.

BNP was initially called brain natriuretic peptide because it was first found in brain tissue (and to distinguish it from a similar protein made in the atria, or upper chambers, of the heart, termed ANP). BNP is actually produced primarily by the left ventricle of the heart (the heart's main pumping chamber). It is associated with blood volume and pressure and with the work that the heart must do in pumping blood throughout the body. Small amounts of a precursor protein, pro-BNP, are continuously produced by the heart. Pro-BNP is then cleaved by the enzyme called corin to release the active hormone BNP and an inactive fragment, NT-proBNP, into the blood.

When the left ventricle of the heart is stretched, the concentrations of BNP and NT-proBNP produced can increase markedly. This situation indicates that the heart is working harder and having more trouble meeting the body's demands. This may occur with heart failure as well as with other diseases that affect the heart and circulatory system. Heart failure is a somewhat misleading term. It does not mean that the heart has stopped working; it just means that it is not pumping blood as effectively as it should be. The increase in circulating BNP or NT-proBNP will reflect this diminished capacity.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

NOTE: If undergoing medical tests makes you or someone you care for anxious, embarrassed, or even difficult to manage, you might consider reading one or more of the following articles: Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort, and Anxiety, Tips on Blood Testing, Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests, and Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests.

Another article, Follow That Sample, provides a glimpse at the collection and processing of a blood sample and throat culture.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.