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Total Protein and A/G Ratio

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Also known as: TP; Albumin/Globulin Ratio
Formal name: Total Protein; Albumin to Globulin Ratio

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The Test Sample

What is being tested?

Proteins are important building blocks of all cells and tissues; they are important for body growth, development, and health. They form the structural part of most organs and make up enzymes and hormones that regulate body functions. This test measures the total amount of the various types of proteins in the liquid (plasma) portion of the blood.

Two classes of proteins are found in the blood, albumin and globulin. Albumin makes up about 60% of the total protein. Produced by the liver, albumin serves a variety of functions including as a carrier protein for many small molecules and ions, as a source of amino acids for tissue metabolism, and as the principle component involved in maintaining osmotic pressure (preventing fluid from leaking out of blood vessels). The remaining 40% of proteins in the plasma are referred to as globulins. The globulin proteins are a heterogeneous group. They include enzymes, antibodies, hormones, carrier proteins, and numerous other types of proteins. The ratio of albumin to globulin (A/G ratio) is calculated from measured albumin and calculated globulin (total protein - albumin).

The level of total protein in the blood is normally a relatively stable value, reflecting a balance in loss of old protein molecules and production of new protein molecules.

Total protein may decrease in conditions:

Total protein may increase with conditions that cause:

The A/G ratio may change whenever the proportions of albumin and other proteins shift (increase or decrease) in relationship to each other.

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm or by a fingerstick (for children and adults) or heelstick (for newborns).

NOTE: If undergoing medical tests makes you or someone you care for anxious, embarrassed, or even difficult to manage, you might consider reading one or more of the following articles: Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort, and Anxiety, Tips on Blood Testing, Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests, and Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests.

Another article, Follow That Sample, provides a glimpse at the collection and processing of a blood sample and throat culture.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.